• Filter by Genre

  • Sort

  • No One Needs To Know.

    • A
    No One Needs To Know.
    Grade: A

    Lindsay Cameron is quickly becoming one of my favorite thriller authors. (This one is not out until May, so if you have not read it yet, order her other book Just One Look to tide you over — that is one of my favorite books!). Lindsay Cameron just does wealthy, Upper East Side (and messed up/dark) so well. This one felt like a mashup of Big Little Lies and Gossip Girl… I read it in a day! The book follows three women living in the same neighborhood. There is Poppy, the wealthy and beautiful socialite whose husband doesn’t want to have sex with her; Heather, the outsider who will do anything to give her daughter a better life than she had; and Norah (my favorite character), the managing director of a bank who can’t seem to balance motherhood and work. The one thing these women have in common is that they are all using the same anonymous forum where they confess their darkest secrets and desires… think Reddit meets Nextdoor, maybe? When the site is hacked, their secrets come to light. But also, a death… and subsequent murder investigation. Meanwhile, there are other little plots happening. The cut-throat race to get into high school. An affair. Drama and drug use amongst the tween set. This was a very fun read; I couldn’t put it down!

  • Demon Copperhead

    • A+
    Demon Copperhead
    Grade: A+

    I felt stressed out for a lot of this book. There is a lot of trauma (drugs, death, addiction, abuse) but while the subject matter is dark, its endearing protagonist makes the book a page turner. My mom had read it and loved it, many of you had said it was your best book of 2022, and I had finished watching Dopesick a few weeks before. This is a tough book at times, but if I could give it an A++ I would. So far, it’s my favorite book of 2023. Damon Copperhead is born to a junkie mother. By the time of his birth, his father is already dead. He is the boy that nobody wants. He finds himself orphaned and family-less, going from foster home to foster home, just trying to stay alive. The storyline follows Demon from childhood through young adulthood, through horrible loss after horrible loss, terrible and sometimes abusive foster homes, child labor, heartbreak, more death, disaster, and loss. In between that there are pockets of sunshine (his athletic success, his friendships, his wit and sense of humor) which makes the book a compulsive read: Damon/Demon’s voice is really just incredible. There is also a lot of good social commentary. I think this would be a great book for book club as I think it would evoke some powerful discussions. It touches on or at least shows us how we treat rural people, what it is like for kids who have to grow up way too fast, and the way that institutional poverty affects children. And of course the pharmaceutical industry. Read this book, I loved it so much. Also now I kind of want to revisit David Copperfield (Dickens) now. I read it as a girl but it’s been a long time.

  • The Ten Thousand Doors of January

    • A
    The Ten Thousand Doors of January
    Grade: A

    I read this book because a reader highly recommended it, saying it gave her Midnight Library vibes. And if you have been here a while, you know… that is one of my most favorite books. For the first 150 pages, I really struggled. A girlfriend told me to keep going, that it was worth the effort. And I am so happy that I did as I ended up really loving the book (gobbling up the last 210 pages in two sittings). In the early 1900’s, January Scaller is the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke. Mr. Locke is a collector of curious objects; her father travels the world to help him add to his collections. January is insatiably curious, and finds herself in a predicament: both bored, and eager to explore the world on her won. When she finds a strange book in a hiding place, telling of secret doors (and a great love), her whole life changes. Each page feels more impossible, more dangerous. The story she is reading entwines with her own. I won’t say any more than that but this is one of those books (once you get past the initial slog!) that leaves you with goosebumps, feeling like you just got home from an in incredible adventure. It had Midnight Library vibes mixed with just a little Cloud Cuckoo Land. Highly recommend.

  • The Lobotomist’s Wife

    • A-
    The Lobotomist’s Wife
    Grade: A-

    I keep saying that I want to read more historical fiction and when I did my best books of 2022 post, a reader said that this was one of her favorite books of the year. I read this in two sittings, it was unputdownable. And slightly creepy but not as dark and disturbing as I can often go. Ruth Emeraldine is a wealthy New York socialite in post WWII New York. Her family owns the big hospital, and she serves as the assistant superintendent. She’s always been happy on her own, recognizing that her professional ambitions make her seem weird and out of place for her time. Her brother had died by suicide earlier and ever since then she’d dedicated her life to helping the mentally ill. When she meets (and hires) Robert Apter, a brilliant doctor, she falls head over heels in love. Robert is supportive of her ambition and drive, and the two soon are married. When Robert pioneers a revolutionary new “miracle” procedure (the lobotomy), he is lauded as a genius. But he soon grows overly confident and negligent. Soon the lobotomy is being prescribed for things as minor as headaches or postpartum depression. Ruth realizes that she needs to stop him before it’s too late. This is a fun, easy read but one you’ll also learn something from it. (The book is inspired by real events and I really didn’t know much about earlier treatments of mental illness save for watching One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest).

  • Crying in H Mart

    • A+
    Crying in H Mart
    Grade: A+

    This book came highly recommended by so many friends, but initially I wasn’t sure I could handle it. It’s really sad. There are content warnings for cancer, taking care of someone with cancer, a dying parent. On the first night I started it, I had a horrible dream where my mother died. But truly, the book is so worth reading. It’s beautifully written and will also make you very hungry. Michelle writes about growing up (as one of the few Asian American kids) in Oregon, and her mother’s high expectations. I loved all of the parts about visiting her grandmother and aunts in Korea (it made me want to plan a trip!). And of course there are the more painful parts. Seeing her take care of her mother, watching her mother fade away, watching the Michelle and her father drift apart and fight… it’s really just an incredibly sad and vulnerable book (but so beautiful and unforgettable that it’s very much worth the read). I loved it.

  • Trust

    • A
    Trust
    Grade: A

    This book was not on my radar until my book club decided to read it and I am so glad they chose it because a) it is amazing and so unique and b) I then saw it everywhere, including Obama’s book picks. This is one of those books where (and this is annoying as a prospective reader!) I can’t tell you very much about it because it will ruin it. I want to gush to you about the last few chapters but will keep my mouth shut. I will tell you that it could be described as a jigsaw puzzle of a novel. It’s about money, but also: intimacy and relationships. And it made me feel a lot: it made me angry!!! The book starts out in the roaring twenties of New York. Benjamin and Helen Rask are an infamous couple. He’s legendary on Wall Street, she’s the daughter of aristocrats. Together, they’re on top of a world that’s already excessive. Questions arise as to how they got this rich — and if Benjamin is responsible for the crash (and subsequent depression). This is all chronicled for the reader in Bonds, published in 1937. A book within a book! There are other versions of the story and we don’t know which one was true. All is revealed in the final section of the book. This is SUCH a good book. I listened to it in audio form as it was sold out when I tried to order. I loved it. So smart and just brilliantly put together!

  • The Villa

    • A-
    The Villa
    Grade: A-

    Ordering this one was a no brainer. I’ve always loved Rachel Hawkins’ books (she has such a great range and I especially love her thrillers!) AND it was the Bad on Paper pick and Becca (my friend/BoP co-host) told me she thought I would really love it, alluding to a narcissistic self-help influencer type. She was right – I loved it! It was the perfect treat book and a great way to start 2022 given that the last two books I’d read were of a more serious nature. This surrounds two best friends/frienemies. There is Chess (formerly Jessica), the influencer/self-help guru, for whom everything always seems to go right. And then there is Emily, a writer who is going through a horrible divorce after struggling with chronic illness, struggling to write her next book. When Chess offers to take Emily to Italy for six weeks (where they’ll both get some writing done), Emily accepts. The only thing is that the villa has a bit of a sordid past. A horrible murder took place back in the seventies. Alternating between past and present, this one was super fun. You have beautiful Italy, frienemy drama, the sex/drug/rock’n’roll of the seventies, and a mystery. I loved it and couldn’t put it down. The ending didn’t quite do it for me which is why it gets an A- and not an A!

  • All This Could Be Different

    • A-
    All This Could Be Different
    Grade: A-

    I picked up this book as it was a 2022 National Book Award Finalist and I had seen it highly recommended all over the place and compared to (a queer version of) Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow. The writing is beautiful, at times it is funny, but at other times it is very hard to read and upsetting. It starts as a love story and becomes a story about friendship and community. Our protagonist, Sneha, graduates college into the Obama era recession. She is queer, Indian, and holding a lot of family secrets. She manages to get an entry-level consulting job where she is earning enough money to send money back to her family. She makes a new friend Tig via a dating app. She dates… eventually meeting and falling for a beautiful dancer called Marina. All the while, despite desperately craving closeness she keeps everyone at arms length… and her family life separate from her personal life (even going so far to tell Marina that her very much alive parents are dead). When things go belly up (her boss stops paying her, her friends are laid off, she must move out of her apartment), the book grows tender as Sneha and her friend group become the glue that holds each other together. This book is really sad at times (I found the last few pages particularly heartbreaking) but it’s extremely touching. My biggest takeaway from it is that no matter how hard things get, they’ll always be okay if you have your friends and people to lean on.

  • Tell Me How to Be

    • A
    Tell Me How to Be
    Grade: A

    This is a very good book. I think it would be a great movie. The story is equal parts heartwarming, funny, and sad. It’s a family story, a coming of age story, a coming out story. It’s about identity, both in a culture and sexuality sort of sense. The book alternates between the perspective of mother and son, a year after the father’s death. Renu Amin has had a charmed life – married to a wealthy doctor who adored her. A year after his death she finds herself a bit lost. binge watching soap operas and pining for an old love. Meanwhile, her son Akash is struggling. He drinks too much, he’s broke, he’s gay — but afraid to come out to his family for fear of losing their love. Now, they are all back in the family house (with Akash’s brother Bijal) which has been sold as Renu is picking up and moving back to be with her family in London. As they pack up the house, secrets come out and resentments brew. Akash compares himself constantly to his golden, seemingly perfect older brother. Renu fantasizes about what her life could have been like if she’d married her first love. Akash resorts to destructive behavior. I won’t tell you how it ends but I loved this book and found myself in tears at the end.

  • Shit, Actually

    • B+
    Shit, Actually
    Grade: B+

    Okay, I mostly loved this book but admittedly, found myself a little irritated at it at some points. I think that the author’s sense of humor (relentlessly snarky) may just not be for me. I listened to it via audiobook and her tone was… a lot! I feel like if I had just read it as a paper book, I would have enjoyed it more. Of course, so many of the films we loved in the nineties just don’t hold up. I personally think it is okay to evolve and grow and learn but still have a nostalgic soft spot for the films we loved when we were younger (and less evolved). I liked the book but found the author’s tone to be condescending! But, that might not come through so much, just reading it in print I think if I read it myself (vs listening to the author), it would seem more silly than snarky. That critique aside, I netted out positive overall and found it very funny most of the time. She systematically (and smartly) takes down all of our favorite films. Love, Actually. The Lion King. Harry Potter. Forrest Gum. The Notebook. Twilight. Garden State. Nothing is safe. I particularly enjoyed her thoughts on American Pie, (wow that really was a terrible movie!). I did notice that she didn’t go after Nancy Meyers and for that, I’m thankful. I found myself a little burnt out by the book by the end but ultimately enjoyed it. It is nostalgic and made me rewatch The Fugitive! Not the most convincing of reviews, but an honest one?

  • All the Dangerous Things

    • A+
    All the Dangerous Things
    Grade: A+

    Okay do I have a new favorite author? Potentially! I had to read this after loving A Flicker in the Dark so much. And you know what? This was even better. But be forewarned, there are trigger warnings for postpartum depression and child abuse. Exactly a year ago, Isabelle Drake’s life drastically changed when her 18 month old son Mason was taken from his crib in the middle of the night as her and her husband slept. Since then, Isabelle has dedicated her life to finding her son. But also: she literally cannot sleep. Besides the occasional catnap or temporary blackout, Isabelle hasn’t slept in a year. The loss of her son and lack of sleep has caused her to appear manic and paranoid at times (ultimately causing the demise of her marriage) but she is relentless… she’ll do anything to find Mason. After speaking at a conference, she meets a true crime podcaster on her flight home. When she learns that his podcast has actually helped to solve cases, she agrees to go on. But as Waylon (podcaster) asks more and more questions (especially about Isabel’s past), she becomes uncomfortable, starting to question herself. This book has it all. So many great twists and turns, an unreliable narrator, and other things I can’t tell you about. I absolutely loved it. A++++!

  • A Flicker in the Dark

    • A
    A Flicker in the Dark
    Grade: A

    This book had come so highly recommended by so many of you — I am so glad that I finally read it, as I could not put it down! Chloe Davis is 32 years old and a psychologist living in Baton Rouge. She owns her own cute home and and is planning her wedding with her dreamy husband. But Chloe has a past. Twenty years ago, her father pled guilty to brutally murdering six teenage girls in her home town. When two local girls go missing all these years later, Chloe begins to worry that it’s all happening again and that a copycat killer is on the loose. She begins to spiral (and thanks to her own substance abuse issues can’t always tell if she is paranoid and delusional or on the verge of helping to solve a series of murders). This is unputdownable! Once I started, I just wanted to stay up all night reading. If you love a good thriller as much as I do, you’re going to want to read this one.

  • The Birdcatcher

    • B+
    The Birdcatcher
    Grade: B+

    I’m going to preface my review by saying that maybe I am just too lowbrow to enjoy this work of literature. It is beautifully written and a National Book Award finalist (amongst other accolades) but it was not my cup of tea. So it gets an A+ for the writing, but a B- for (personal!) enjoyability. So take this review for what it is… the review of someone who loves great writing but values plot over writing. This was just a little too literary for me. The book takes place primarily on the island of Ibiza. Amanda is a writer (with a past of her own). Her best friend Catherine is a talented sculptor, but Catherine can’t stop trying to kill her husband. Because of this, she is repeatedly institutionalized. Meanwhile, her husband will never leave her! There’s an interesting cast of characters… all mostly artists and writers. There are Amanda’s different lovers (including a Black man whose entire lower body has turned white), a (potentially murderous) painter called Gillette (like the razor), and more. It’s a weird little book but the writing is incredible. While it wasn’t my favorite, I’m still very glad I read it.

  • Stone Cold Fox

    • A
    Stone Cold Fox
    Grade: A

    This book is a wild ride. It is not out til February (Valentine’s Day, ha!) but well worth the pre-order. It’s one of those up all night thrillers you won’t be able to put down! It has everything I love in a domestic thriller. A conniving and gold digging con-artist. Old money. Scandal! It is perfect for fans of Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen, Julie Clarke, or Liv Constantine. Bea has a traumatic past: being carted around the country by her scammer mother. They never stay in one place too long; she doesn’t even know her real name (or her mother’s real name for that matter!). But Bea is smart and beautiful, has learned the art of swindling men from her mother. Now, years later, she is determined to marry rich. Not just rich… wealthy, old money. When she sets her eyes on Collin Case (the heir to a giant family company, I thought of Johnson & Johnson), she knows that he is the one. Collin is smitten, but she encounters resistance from his family. Her biggest opponent is his childhood best friend (who is also in love with Collin): Gale Wallace Leicester. Gale quickly proves herself a worthy opponent; smarter and more wily than Bea had expected. Bea has to decide what she really wants and how far she is willing to go to get (and keep) it!

  • Aesthetica

    • B+
    Aesthetica
    Grade: B+

    I ordered this book after reading this piece in the New York Times and wound up finishing the book in just a day. It’s haunting, to say the least. Anna is a former influencer who started at 19… moving to LA to become an Instagram mode. Now she is 35 years old, working for Sephora (they just say “the black and white store”) and having one big surgery (called Aesthetica) to reverse all the plastic surgery she had when she was young. This is a major surgery, she is essentially risking her life to return to her former self. Alternating between her 19 year old self in 2017 and her 35 year old self in the future, we visit Anna’s past trauma and her relationship with her former manager/boss Jake. We see her slippery slope of plastic surgery and changing herself to fit a certain aesthetic (the book opens with her getting a bikini wax). We meet her mother and examine that relationship (these parts were especially heartbreaking). The book is very dark and moving (and fortunately completely, drastically different from my own “influencer” experience). I couldn’t put it down. It was unsettling and a train wreck at some parts, but ultimately very good.

  • The Rabbit Hutch

    • A+
    The Rabbit Hutch
    Grade: A+

    I ordered this immediately when I saw that it had won the National Book Award for Fiction but wasn’t sure how I’d feel about it. I ended up loving it – it’s creative, sad, and funny all at once. It’s set over the course of one hot summer week in the town of Vacca Vale, Indiana in a low income housing complex, known as The Rabbit Hutch. The town was once a bustling industrial center but now that’s dried up — though the factories may become the homes for new startups, giving Vacca Vale a second chance that not everyone wants. The book introduces us to its many residents. Three teenage boys who have gotten into animal sacrifice. A new mother who is afraid of her son’s eyes. An obituary writer. Plus, the son of a beloved actress (who maybe shouldn’t have been as beloved, after all). The real star of the book is Blandine, a young woman (living with the three teenage boys who she can’t stand). The four of them met in a foster care rehab program (after aging out of the system) and decided to live together on a whim. Blandine has secrets. Why did she drop out of her prestigious high school? I will say no more than that but I couldn’t put this one down. The writing is intoxicating and the way that each character’s story weaves together is incredible.

  • Book Lovers

    • A
    Book Lovers
    Grade: A

    Emily Henry is one of those authors who makes me think… “hmm, maybe I do like romance novels!?” And then I read something by someone am else and am back to murders the next day. Her books are just.. such treats. I loved this one because it poked fun of romance novels a bit, and also: the characters were so likable and relatable. You probably know this by now but one of the reasons I tend to stay away from reading romance is that the female characters are always a little bit pathetic/messy… and/or younger which is fine but I am 41 and just don’t want to read about a messy twenty-something who needs to be rescued. Our leading lady, Nora, is a book agent and a bit of a workaholic in her thirties. In her words, “the one who gets dumped” by her boyfriends who leave her to marry an innkeeper’s daughter or trade city living for the country. She is, as she puts it, the Christmas movie villain on the Peloton bike. When her younger sister Libby (who Nora has always watched out for after their mother died when they were younger) suggests they take a break to spend a month in Sunshine Falls (just outside of Asheville), all bets are off. Especially when Nora runs into her nemesis Charlie Lastra (an equally workaholic book editor). Maybe he’s not as bad as he seems. This book is the perfect romance. It was cheesy at times but in an enjoyable way. I got choked up at the end which is not something that usually happens. I couldn’t love it more!

  • Anon Pls.

    • A-
    Anon Pls.
    Grade: A-

    If you are a fan of the DeuxMoi account (who isn’t!) I think you will gobble this book right up! It’s such a fun read. It is a fictional telling of how the account may or may not have been founded, and I couldn’t put it down! Cricket Lopez is the assistant to one of the most notorious (mean, abusive) celebrity stylists. One night, she is a bit tipsy and decides to turn her old instagram account into a source for celebrity gossip. What happens next is amazing. The account takes off, nearly overnight. The account turns into a giant success and everyone is trying to figure out.. “Who exactly is DeuxMoi!?” She’s approached by investors who want to buy the account, she is terrified of losing her anonymity (as are her friends: they’re all in the same industry and if she’s “outed,” their jobs are at stake too!). Meanwhile, she’s spreading herself thin, disappearing at work, etc. I really enjoyed the book. It made me nostalgic for being young in New York… it was fun and fast paced and reminded me a bit of a Devil Wears Prada for the digital age!

  • Silver Girl

    • A
    Silver Girl
    Grade: A

    An older book (from 2011) but a good one. This had been sitting in my TBR pile for ages. I picked it up during the move because Elin Hilderbrand’s novels never disappoint, they are also always just so extremely satisfying! And heartwarming: I wanted heartwarming. This one surrounds a Ruth Madoff type of character. Meredith Delinn is the most hated woman in America. Her husband, Freddy, has been caught running a massive Ponzi scheme and thousands of people have lost everything because of him. Now, Meredith has absolutely nothing.. just one box of belongings. She heads to Nantucket to hide out at her childhood best friend Connie’s home in Nantucket. This book has everything. There is a redemption angle for Meredith as she works to prove that she didn’t know about her husband’s antics, there’s Connie and Meredith’s friendship, there’s a mother daughter thing, there is two romances, and so much more. I really loved this book. The ending felt like a warm hug. It’s up there with The Blue Bistro in terms of favorite Elin Hilderbrand books.

  • All Her Little Secrets

    • A
    All Her Little Secrets
    Grade: A

    I really loved this book… utterly unputdownable! Ellice Littlejohn has pulled herself up from a rough childhood (she grew up poor, in a small Georgia town with an alcoholic mother and an abusive stepfather). Now, she seemingly has it all: a gorgeous condo and a well-paying job as a corporate attorney. A bit complicated as she’s sleeping with her (married) boss Michael, but doing well overall. When she finds Michael shot dead in his office (and walks away like nothing has happened), her life is upended. First, she is promoted to his role. The dream… except it feels icky and too fast. Things continue to get weirder. The entire executive team misses Michael’s funeral for a party. The cops are investigating his death as a homicide. And Ellice’s secrets start to come out. (Like her brother Sam – who has done time in jail – what was he doing in Ellice’s office building the morning of Michael’s murder!?) This book is fast paced and twisty, but also an exploration of race + racist behavior in the workplace. I couldn’t put it down and would highly recommend it. I also can’t believe it is Wanda M. Morris’s debut novel – she just released her second book and I ordered it on the spot!

  • Mad Honey

    • A+
    Mad Honey
    Grade: A+

    This is a really important book but the annoying thing is that if I told you the secondary (and possibly most important) thing this book is about, it would ruin a big twist. This is exactly what my mom told me, which was annoying but I’m glad she didn’t tell me! There is a trigger warning for domestic abuse. Olivia McAfee is a beekeeper living in New Hampshire with her high school age son, Asher. They live a small but idyllic life. Asher is madly in love with his girlfriend Lily, Olivia has found happiness (after an abusive marriage) with her bees and small town life. Asher’s girlfriend Lily has secrets of her own. When the unthinkable happens (Lily has been found dead) and Asher is brought in for questioning, more secrets come out. The book alternates between the perspective of Olivia and Lily and is utterly unputdownable. Alternating between past and present and taking us through Asher’s court trial and the verdict, I was on the edge of my seat. I really loved it. I cried a few times… it’s very sad, but also suspenseful. As with everything Jodi Picoult writes, it’s impeccably researched, too. Highly recommend this one!

  • The Soulmate

    • B+
    The Soulmate
    Grade: B+

    I love Sally Hepworth’s books and was so excited when I received an an advance copy in the mail. Pippa is married to Gabe, the love of her life. Their marriage has had its ups and downs but they are happy, living in a beautiful coastal town, nestled atop the cliffs. Unfortunately, the cliffs have become a popular place for people to come to end their life. Gabe has developed something of a reputation for being a rescuer… literally, talking people off of a ledge. Then one day, it doesn’t work and a woman falls to her death. When Pippa realizes that Gabe actually knew the victim, questions arise and secrets come out. Pippa begins to wonder if she has been just turning a blind eye to her husband’s bad behavior… questioning if she ever really knew him at all. The book is told from both the perspective of Pippa and the dead woman. I enjoyed this but I wasn’t a huge fan of the ending. But still, worth reading. Everything Sally Hepworth writes is excellent. (If you were curious/wondering, The Mother-in-Law and The Good Sister remain two of my favorites!!!)

  • Stay Awake

    • A-
    Stay Awake
    Grade: A-

    This book was torture to read at times as it felt like the story would/could never be resolved! This one is very complex, so be prepared to have to pay very good attention at all times. I had some bad airplane delays and was grateful to have this with me as it totally captured every ounce of my attention. Liv Reese wakes up in the back of a taxi cab. She has blacked out and has no idea where she is. STAY AWAKE is written on her skin. She looks for her phone and that’s gone — replaced by a bloody knife. When she asks the taxi driver to take her home, a stranger answers and tells her that she no longer lives there. She’s disoriented and can’t remember anything. She knows she is a good person, but all signs point to her being the murderer. The book alternates between the present and two years ago where Liv was a successful magazine writer living with her good friend. But now she is on the run and can’t remember anything. This was really stressful to read but also so satisfying. I definitely recommend it.

  • The Cage

    • A
    The Cage
    Grade: A

    This is one of those thrillers that you think about for weeks after finishing it. It had me on the edge of my seat with my stomach tied in knots until the very last page. Here is the premise: two women at a glamorous New York fashion behemoth are in an elevator that gets stuck together. Only one walks out alive. Was it murder or was it suicide? The book then alternates between the perspective of the general counsel at the firm they work together and Shea: the women who got out alive. We get to know Shea and how down on her luck she is. In the 2008 recession both she and her husband lost their high-paying jobs and with that lost everything: their credit, their home, their wardrobes… their dignity. There is also a big mystery and a scandal at the company. I don’t want to say too much but this is definitely worth picking up… I really loved it!